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    The harm done by America’s new tariffs

    ON TRADE, President Donald Trump has launched lots of investigations, withdrawn from one deal (see Banyan) and started the renegotiation of another. But this week is the first time he has put up a big new barrier. On January 22nd he approved broad and punitive duties, of up to 30% on imports of solar panels […] More

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    The growing danger of great-power conflict

    IN THE past 25 years war has claimed too many lives. Yet even as civil and religious strife have raged in Syria, central Africa, Afghanistan and Iraq, a devastating clash between the world’s great powers has remained almost unimaginable. No longer. Last week the Pentagon issued a new national defence strategy that put China and […] More

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    How to tame the tech titans

    NOT long ago, being the boss of a big Western tech firm was a dream job. As the billions rolled in, so did the plaudits: Google, Facebook, Amazon and others were making the world a better place. Today these companies are accused of being BAADD—big, anti-competitive, addictive and destructive to democracy. Regulators fine them, politicians […] More

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    The new space race

    LATER this month, if all has gone according to plan, a rocket called the Falcon Heavy will take off from Cape Canaveral, in Florida (see article). Its mission is to put a sports car in orbit around the sun. The Falcon Heavy is the latest product of SpaceX, a firm founded by Elon Musk, an […] More

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    Value matters again in currency markets

    IN DECEMBER a new dollar bill came into circulation adorned with the signature of Steve Mnuchin. Instead of his usual scrawl, the treasury secretary opted to print his name. If he hoped that his best handwriting would give the greenback a fillip, he may well be disappointed. The dollar reached a peak against a basket […] More

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    Tunisia needs help if it is to remain a model for the Arab world

    “BREAD, freedom, dignity.” These were the demands of Tunisian protesters who threw off autocracy and sparked the Arab spring seven years ago this month. Tunisians now have more freedom and some dignity. But bread is scarcer than ever. GDP per person has barely budged since the revolution. That is why Tunisia has once again been […] More

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    Carillion’s collapse raises awkward questions about contracting out

    WHAT do high-speed railways, school lunches and army bases have in common? Perhaps not much, which may be one reason for the dramatic collapse of Carillion, a jack-of-all-trades contractor that did a bewildering array of work for Britain’s public sector. On January 15th the firm went into liquidation, casting doubt on the prospects of its […] More

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    How to tame the tech titans?

    NOT long ago, being the boss of a big Western tech firm was a dream job. As the billions rolled in, so did the plaudits: Google, Facebook, Amazon and others were making the world a better place. Today these companies are accused of being BAADD—big, anti-competitive, addictive and destructive to democracy. Regulators fine them, politicians […] More

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    India has a hole where its middle class should be

    AFTER China, where next? Over the past two decades, the world’s most populous country has become the market qua non of just about every global company seeking growth. As its economy slows, businesses are looking for the next set of consumers to keep the tills ringing. To many, India feels like the heir apparent. Its […] More

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    The next super-collider should be built in China

    ON JULY 4th 2012 news of the discovery of the Higgs boson by researchers at CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory, electrified science and the wider public. This particle, generated inside the lab’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC), was the last missing piece of the Standard Model, one of the most successful theories physicists have devised. Since its […] More

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    Cutting adolescents’ use of social media will not solve their problems

    FIRST they went for tobacco, coal and sugar. Now they are targeting smartphones and social media. On January 6th two large investors in Apple demanded that the technology company must help parents curtail their children’s iPhone use, citing research into the links between adolescent social-media habits and risk factors for suicide, such as depression. Old […] More

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    Let the Salvadoreans stay

    ELENA AGUILAR came to America illegally from El Salvador in 1996 to escape her children’s violent father. Earthquakes in her home country in 2001 brought her good fortune of a sort: she was among 290,000 Salvadoreans who received “temporary protected status” (TPS) from the American government. That allowed her to live and work in America—in […] More

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